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Mortgage Foreclosure in New York  

This guide will help the researcher access mortgage foreclosure information as quickly and efficiently as possible. It includes a variety of resources including information on forms, statutes, case law, treatises, articles and more.
Last Updated: Mar 5, 2014 URL: http://guides.tourolaw.edu/mortgageforeclosureinNewYork Print Guide RSS Updates

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Author

This guide was prepared by John Hadler, JD, MLIS, in 2010, when John was an intern at the Gould Law Library.

 

Overview

The recent economic crisis has impacted many areas of life, and none more dramatically than the area of mortgage foreclosures.  Statutes, regulations and case law have seen major changes which are continuing.

This guide will help the researcher access the type of information needed as quickly and efficiently as possible.  To this end, the resources will be grouped by type; thus, dictionaries will be grouped together, encyclopedias will be grouped together, forms books will be grouped together and so on.  It should be noted that forms books frequently will have some text, just as text books might have some forms, so there is a certain amount of discretion in a work’s placement.  Works were placed according to the main thrust.  Also, within each group, New York works will be set forth first, followed by general works.

Each listing will have the basic information one would expect: title, author, call number and so on.  In addition, there will be a brief explanation of the type of information (forms, text, both) to be found in the particular resource, and the nature of the resource: hardcover or looseleaf, size, one volume or many, and the  updating method. 

Particular note will be made of the “research tools” available in a source.  Does it have a Table of Cases?  A Table of Statutes? An Index?  What features allow you to move around within the source?   What features lead you out to other sources of information?

This pathfinder was designed with the needs of Touro’s Bankruptcy and Foreclosure Clinic in mind, that is to say getting practical information to those facing an immediate problem.  We would, of course, hope that all researchers find it useful.

 

 

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